Guyana: Improving the East Bank Demerara Road

We provided design and bid documents for the rehabilitation and road safety upgrading of 25km of the peri-urban road linking the main airport and the interior to the capital Georgetown as well as a new Weight Control Station. New legislation was also drafted.

The East Bank Public Road (EBPR) provides the only link between the interior with its mining activities and hardwood forests, and the capital Georgetown.

The increased traffic, particularly of heavy vehicles, has damaged the road and presents a safety hazard for the more vulnerable road users, particularly in the many villages along the route.

IMC/CEMCO provided expertise to address not only the rehabilitation of the existing pavement but, through specialist inputs, to enhance the safety of road users, especially the more vulnerable; control overweight vehicles; amend the laws of Guyana to support axle and vehicle weight control.

The objectives of the project were to provide, over the 25km length between Grove and Timehri, solutions to

  • Deterioration of the road pavement
  • Road safety issues throughout the roadway, including a lack of safe pedestrian facilities, primarily in the ‘urbanized’ sections of the roadway
  • Regular halting of traffic flows due to lack of storage and/or for vehicles right turns into and out of connecting streets, e.g. lack of roadside facilities
  • Unsafe alignments at various locations
  • Lack of legal authority and physical infrastructure to implement vehicle overload controls
  • Flooding instances along and alongside the road. 

In addition there was the need for two new bridges in the villages of Friendship and Soesdyke and to provide data to overcome the threat of the Demerara River to the stability and usage of the roadway in several sections.

Due to the fact that much of the land in Georgetown and adjacent to the EBPR is at or below sea level, consideration was given to the climate change impacts in the area.

The road and its ability to function as an evacuation route and re-supply route in the event of a future flood event was also considered and options for enhancing the disaster resilience of the road were included in the designs.

IMC and CEMCO provided the following services under the project:

  • Initial investigations of the existing situation along the road section with particular regard to the safety hazards, constraints of the urbanised areas, unsafe alignments, etc.
  • Traffic surveys and pavement investigations to assess the residual life of the existing pavements;
  • Satellite imagery and ortho-rectification to provide 3D mapping of the road corridor;
  • Cadastral and topographical surveys and models of the existing road
  • Hydrological and hydraulic studies and designs for >60 drainage structures and their kokers (sluices)
  • Hydrological and hydraulic studies and designs for drainage channels and ditches and retention channels alongside the road
  • Road Safety inspections of the road length at day and at night, accident investigations and recommendations for road safety improvements along the disparate sections of the road
  • Preliminary designs for the road’s rehabilitation and economic analysis of the proposed options
  • Extensive social and environmental engagement processes along the route to guide the design process both at the preliminary and detailed design stage
  • Detailed design of approved road rehabilitation option, including new pavement and drainage structures, junctions improvement and closures, safety improvements to retained unsafe alignments, cycle tracks, sidewalks, traffic calming at urbanised sections, and disaster resilience improvements
  • Bid documents for the project
  • Road safety audits of the completed design stages
  • Design and bid documents for new weight control facility
  • Revised legal instruments to support the vehicle overload control regime.
Region
Project Name

East Bank Demerara Road Improvement Project from Grove to Timehri

project status

2014-2015

Client

Inter-American Development Bank

Focus areas
last updated

April 11, 2017